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Webinar: The Trusted CI Framework: Toward Practical, Comprehensive Cybersecurity Programs
In this presentation, we will present the motivations behind and structure for the Trusted CI Framework and related implementation guidance for research. We’ll field questions, as well as discuss opportunities for the community to be involved.

The Framework team members are Craig Jackson, Bob Cowles, Kay Avila, Scott Russell, Von Welch, and Jim Basney.

About Trusted CI: Trusted CI is the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. See our website trustedci.org.

*NOTE:* Be sure to check your SPAM/JUNK folder for the registration confirmation email.

Jun 24, 2019 11:00 AM in Indiana (East)

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Speakers

Craig Jackson
Program Director @Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research (CACR)
Craig Jackson is Program Director at the Indiana University Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research (CACR), where his research interests include information security program development and governance, cybersecurity assessments, legal and regulatory regimes' impact on information security and cyber resilience, evidence-based security, and innovative defenses. He leads CACR's collaborative work with the defense community and an interdisciplinary assessment and guidance tem for the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. He is a co-author of Security from First Principles: A Practical Guide to the Information Security Practice Principles. Craig is a graduate of the IU Maurer School of Law, IU School of Education, and Washington University in St. Louis.
Bob Cowles
Sr. Fellow @Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research
Robert (Bob) Cowles is principal in BrightLite Information Security performing cybersecurity assessments and consulting in research and education about information security and identity management. He served as CISO at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (1997-2012); participated in security policy development for LHC Computing Grid (2001-2008); and was an instructor at University of Hong Kong in information security (2000-2003). His CACR contributions include research for the XSIM project and the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence.